EMF (European Missionary Fellowship) is truly European with workers and associates in places stretching from Ukraine to Norway, to Ireland.

 

 

From 1935 to 1940, a young Scots evangelist, James Stewart, labored for the sake of the Gospel in several countries in Eastern Europe. This led to the formation of the European Evangelistic Crusade, and EMF was established as a mission in its own right in 1959.

 

The continent of Europe comprises of about 13% of the world’s population eight hundred million people living in over thirty countries. All have a Christian tradition of sorts – Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant – but know very little of evangelical truth. Over the past half a century or so atheism, humanism, secularism and materialism have eroded these traditions. The over-riding aim of EMF is to establish Biblical Christianity throughout Europe. This embraces the work of evangelism, church-planting and supporting Gospel churches, at the same time encouraging them to become self-governing and self-supporting.

 

The collapse of Communism and the opening up of Eastern Europe has again provided opportunities for missionary activity. However, the general picture is of a vast spiritual wasteland that urgently needs laborers to clear the ground, sow the seed of God’s Word, and pray to God for the increase.

 

EMF are becoming increasingly involved in translating and publishing good Christian literature to assist those engaged in Gospel work. This venture will comprise of publishing houses in two European countries – Poland and Spain. The intention is to provide believers in these countries and beyond, with a little of the wealth of Christian literature available to the rest of the English speaking world. The publishing also includes Spanish translations for the Banner of Truth Press, and books in other languages include Chichewa (Malawi) Swahili (Kenya) and Catalan.

 

Read The Vision of Europe (EMF magazine / newspaper) available at the back of the Church. It is stimulating and challenging. Pray for the pastors and workers in Europe.